John Muir Trail: What will we remember?

Only the strong survive at the higher altitudes.

It was hard to anticipate just what hiking the John Muir Trail would mean to each of us. It’s been equally difficult to put into words a complete description of our day in/day out journey along the John Muir Trail. We struggled, we learned, we laughed and we celebrated. Each day was a combination of emotions that left us both exhausted and exhilarated as we climbed into our tent each night.

Sometimes it was better not knowing exactly where the trail would lead.
Sunsets created unique light.
Ten days before the Forest Service shut down the forest due fire danger, we were given the okay to have our one and only campfire. We affectionately renamed this forest service campground “Camp Tinderbox.”
Alarm at 5:00 a.m. Breakfast at 6:00. On the trail by 7:00.
photo credit: Mark

A two-person tent was pretty tight quarters for two people.
The encouragement we received from our fellow hikers kept us going.
Most of all, we will remember what fun it was to share 30 days on the trail with nine other hikers and four packers with horses and mules. (Three not pictured above)

Categories: John Muir Trail | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Post navigation

One thought on “John Muir Trail: What will we remember?

  1. Lori OliverTierney

    I am so happy for you. You did amazing and garnered much from your trek. The trail never leaves us it just revisits us in different forms. Thank you for letting me follow along on your amazing journey which of course brought you many Happy trails,

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: