Posts Tagged With: Civil War Battlefields

Five-sided History Lesson

Construction of Fort Pulaski, a massive five-sided fort built to protect the city and port of Savannah, began in 1829. Named for Casimir Pulaski, a Revolutionary War commander, the fort was ranked one of the “most spectacular harbor defense structures” in the United States during the Civil War years.

Fort Pulaski is located on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River.

The government rented enslaved people from nearby plantations to build Fort Pulaski. The wall towers are 22 feet high inside and the walls average between five and eleven feet thick. It’s estimated that 25 million bricks, handmade locally by enslaved men, women and children, were used when it was completed in 1847. A close look reveals some bricks carry their fingerprints.

In 1862, the Confederate-held fort fell to Union soldiers. The north then formed a blockade that cut off the South’s ability to export cotton and other goods via the Savannah port…all part of the plan to weaken the southern economy and win the war.

The site was declared a National Monument in 1924.

Before leaving, we walked the two-mile round trip on the Lighthouse Overlook Trail. At the end was a view of Georgia’s smallest lighthouse. It ceased operation as a beacon in 1909, but was relit for historical purposes in 2007.

For all you movie buffs, I have one more fun fact to share. It seems Fort Pulaski has a bit of a starring role in scenes from the B-movie Abraham Lincoln vs. Zombies. Pop some corn, it looks like a good one!


Categories: Road Trips, U.S. National Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Battling it out on Savage Island

We survived a wild week in an untamed wilderness known as Savage Island. The deer ran with abandon, the raccoons thought they owned the place and the squirrels were relentless in their efforts to steal our Happy Hour hors d’oeuvres.

The campground is located at the end of a long, straight road within the boundaries of Georgia’s Fort McAllister State Park. Surrounded by marshlands, numerous waterways and the Ogeechee River, the park is home to one of the best preserved Confederate earthwork fortifications. We put off the decision to tour the fort. Neither of us were eager to wander alongside the ghosts of another reconstructed Civil War battlefield, but curiosity got the better of us.

Despite all the fortifications, on December 13, 1864, Fort McAllister fell – the final victim of General Sherman’s famous March to Sea. While the Civil War came to an end soon after, the battlefields live on throughout the southern states. It would take a lifetime to explore them all.

Categories: Road Trips | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

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