Backroads Across America: The Place Where FDR died

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We came to Warm Springs, Georgia for its amazing scenery and to stay at Franklin Delano Roosevelt State Park, the state’s largest, seen at top on our drive today. History was another attraction. FDR came here for more than 20 years to bathe in the warm waters that helped him cope with the paralysis caused by polio.

He would drive his convertible, using hand controls he helped develop, from his rustic cabin into the town of Warm Springs and swim with locals. He especially enjoyed sharing the pool with children, even playing water volleyball. These photos show his wheelchair, the desk at which he was sitting when he fell mortally ill, and the bed in which he died on April 12, 1945.

We drove from the Little White House into Warm Springs and enjoyed an authentic southern luncheon buffet at the charming Bulloch House Restaurant in the tiny town. We were too stuffed to sample the boiled peanuts and deep-fried gator offered at the outdoor market, where we strolled after lunch.

Categories: Back Roads Across America, Backroads Across America | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

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14 thoughts on “Backroads Across America: The Place Where FDR died

  1. What an amazing piece of history. I am reading a book about FDR and the war right now and Warm Springs is on my list of places to visit someday. Out of curiosity, do they address his mistress there, and the fact that she was with him when he died and Eleanor wasn’t?

    • There is mention that Lucy Mercer Rutherford was at the cabin when FDR died. When you visit, there is also a good museum as part of the complex. His cars and lots of interesting exhibits. What book are you reading?

      • 1944, by Jay Winik. Although admittedly the title is inaccurate, as it goes into detail about far more than just 1944.

  2. ken gudger

    thanks for the history lesson. Much appreciated. ken

  3. Great post, so interesting and fabulous photos. Weather looks amazing too.

  4. It is a fascinating place…there is also a very good museum there.

  5. Jackie Bachman

    Love the history! Reg I hope you do a presentation on this trip!

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    • Thanks, Jackie! We are staying at another Georgia state park tonight, across the state near Savannah. It was a confederate prison for 11,000. We saw our first gator warning sign, but no gators.

  6. Deborah Gudger

    Thanks for taking us to such interesting places-this is one I’d really like to visit! I’m sorry we didn’t get a review of the deep fried gator…. ; ( ;D

  7. We just toured our new campground, a state park in eastern Georgia. We tried to find an alligator on the lake shores, but they must not like Oregonians.

  8. Lori Oliver-Tierney

    I have loved your posts. Thanks so much for sending them. I admire your sense of adventure and fun and history. Happy trails, Lori Oliver-Tierney

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