Posts Tagged With: Crater Lake

Crater Lake Detour

Our weather this past week has been positively springlike and today promised us more of the same…a perfect day for a Sunday drive. We climbed in the truck and Reg aimed uphill. Our sights (and appetites) were set on lunch at one of our favorite mountain area restaurants.

But then I said, “Let’s go to Crater Lake.” And so we did!

This was our first winter visit to Crater Lake National Park. Fortunately we didn’t need a cozy fireplace to warmup today since the lodge is closed for the season. Without snowshoes we had to settle for wandering along the plowed village road, peeking at the lake when we could.

Since we detoured from our original plan, lunch was a casual affair at the Village Cafe. While we ate we eavesdropped as a park ranger spouted statistics to a family of first time visitors:

Crater Lake is the deepest lake (1,949 feet) in the United States. Deeper than Empire State Building stacked on top of Seattle’s Space Needle.

Because of clouds, fog and bad weather, winter visitors have only a 50% chance of seeing the lake. (We felt lucky!)

No streams flow in or out of the lake. Water level remains constant due to precipitation, evaporation and seepage.

Today’s drive opened our eyes to just how close we live to this beautiful National Park. Winter, summer, spring or fall…this is a detour we’ll be sure to take again!

Categories: Ashland life, Road Trips, U.S. National Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Colossal Newberry volcano begs for exploration

We stopped for a picnic near Little Crater Campground, about halfway around the trail from our starting point. The Forest Service camp offers water, pit toilets and roomy campsites with views like this. The jagged rock is Paulina Peak.

Paulina Lake's elevation is 6,340 feet.

Oh, what a difference a day makes!

We packed our hiking shoes and a picnic and headed for a second day in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

After a 34-mile drive south and then east from Bend, we were greeted by brilliant sunshine and twin lakes that filled an area bigger than Crater Lake.

The lakes are in two calderas left after hundreds of thousands of years of volcanic eruptions.

Our main event was a 7.5-mile trek around Paulina Lake, passing warm springs, a massive obsidian glass lava flow and a beautiful, rustic campground. The trail was fairly flat, with a couple of relatively brief inclines and declines.

Then we drove a few miles to East Lake, where we found what we were hoping for: a tasty dessert.

The national monument is huge and offers many days of activities and sites.

We will be back!

Four cabins built along Paulina Lake in the 1930s are in dire need of repairs. The Forest Service and Deschutes Historical Society are leading an effort to save them.

The East Lake Resort offers boat rentals.

With just a week left in the summer season, the East Lake Resort had two berry cobblers to sweeten our lakeside view.

Tumalo State Park near Bend is a great location for exploring a wealth of outdoor attractions in the area.

 

Categories: Road Trips | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Reflecting on Crater Lake

Rocking chairs line the back deck of the Crater Lake Lodge. The perfect spot to enjoy a glass of wine and this incredible view!

No lolly gagging around for us this Sunday morning…we headed out bright and early, anxious to explore exciting new territory. Back in January Reg had made reservations for us to spend one night at the Crater Lake Lodge and tonight was the night.

As you can see, our day was perfect and it was made even better by the opening of the Rim Road Drive just a day or two ago…several weeks ahead of schedule. This meant we were able to drive the entire 32 mile loop around the lake.

This rock formation, which seems to be floating in Crater Lake, is the smaller of two islands. It is known as Phantom Ship.

The Cleetwood Cove Trail is the only way to get down to the shore. Cloud cap Overlook provided a scenic lunch spot. Wizard Island is the larger of two islands in Crater Lake.

 

Categories: Ashland life | Tags: , , , , | 6 Comments

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